We work with the most vulnerable and maglinsed, growing up in the toughest of circumstances. Our work addresses some of the most challenging issues facing children and families around the world today, including modern day slavery and trafficking, dangerous working conditions, and gender inequality. Read more about the issues we’re working on here.

Poverty

Poverty is the root cause to many injustices and inequalities people face around the world. It is a barrier to support, services, education, and livelihoods, safe housing. One out of five children live in extreme poverty, the negative effects of poverty can impact a child for their entire life.

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Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking

The UN’s International Labour Organisation estimates that there are 40.3 million people trapped in modern slavery around the world,1 in 4 of them are children. There are many ways people become trapped in modern slavery: through violence and control people are threatened into forced labour; people are exploited into dangerous work conditions; sexually exploited, groomed into sex work or forced to work in the adult entertainment industry; bonded labour or debt bondage, people are trapped by debt or poverty, forced to work off their debt, or their employer withholds their payments or underpays them; trafficked across borders into forced labour; and and forced marriage. Children with a disability can be at even higher risk of exploitation through slavery.

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Street Connected Children

Street connected children rely on the streets for income and survival. The streets play a vital role in their everyday lives and identities, even if they are not rough sleeping. Many children who live and work on the streets have run away from dysfunctional families where there are problems of domestic violence, substance-abuse, neglect, and poverty or are orphans or have been abandoned. However, many are still with their families. They may work on the streets but return to their family at night or every few days.

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Rubbish Dump Working

Waste picking is a job for the poorest of poor. It is estimated that there are around 15 million people around the world working as waste pickers. Waste pickers are extremely vulnerable, most live in slums or in public spaces. Many child waste pickers aren't registered at birth, meaning they don't have access to government assistance, political representation, or public health and education services. Children and their families work long days, exposed to unhygienic conditions, toxic fumes and injury from sharp objects and machinery. Not only is their work dangerous it is also unreliable. Working in an informal economy, they rely on what they scavenge to resell to earn a daily wage.

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Working Children + Child Labour

It is estimated that there are 152 million victims of child labour and 73 million children work in hazardous child labour. Whilst child labour takes many forms, there is an urgency to eliminate the worst forms of child labour – all forms of slavery, forced labour and debt bondage, sexual exploitation, pornography, illicit activities or exploitative work, which by its very nature will harm the development, well being and health of a child.

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Child Marriage

1 in 4 young women alive today were married in childhood. Each year, there are 12 million girls married before 18. A 2017 World Bank report into the economic impacts of child marriage estimated that more than 41,000 girls under the age of 18 marry every day and half of all girls in the poorest families in the world are married as children. Often it is seen as a way to ease financial burden because the girl becomes the responsibility of the husband. World Bank estimates that ending child marriage could generate over $500 billion in benefits each year.

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Gender Equality

Much progress has been made for girls and women's rights and equality but they have not yet gained gender equity. Forced labour and modern slavery, child marriage, and sexual and gender-based violence or abuse are some of the most severe barriers girls and women face in development and gender equality. Though it is a global problem, girls and women living in extreme poverty are more disadvantaged. Girls and women are often excluded and discriminated against in education, political representation, and the labour market. Global prevalence of child sexual abuse is estimated at 18% for girls and 7.6% for boys. Women across the globe are paid less, have fewer workers’ rights and are more likely to be in low paying jobs than men, while they also still do 60 to 80% of unpaid domestic work (UKDFID 2018).

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Quality Education

Lack of education has an impact on children for the rest of their lives, from their earning potential to their self-confidence to their ability to negotiate access to their basic rights or exercising their right to vote. Quality education gives children better futures and opportunities in life. A lot of our programme work focuses on girls education, bridging the gender gap between girls and boys.

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Child Safeguarding and Protection

We support children and young people who face the worst forms of injustice, violence, abuse, and hardship. Working in high risk situations, children and young adults may be more vulnerable. Through our work, we aim to ensure that all those who come into contact with children and young adults are aware of the duty of care to ensure no harm comes to them. We are committed to child protection and safeguarding, protecting them from harm, exploitation, or abuse while ensuring their well being and rights are protected. Their safety and protection is our priority.

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Partnerships

Local level national level - policy ? (link to the new strategic framework) Collaborating with in country partners ensures our projects are supported by local expertise and local participation. Partnerships promote sustainability and equality within our projects and provide an opportunity to build capacities, support local agendas and create long-term relationships.

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Child Participation

We believe that the development agenda is best shaped not only by listening to children, but by acting on what children have to say. We aim to promote children’s voices in identifying the challenges they face and finding solutions to their problems.

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Income Generation

The ways in which people can earn a living in developing countries is changing rapidly and as a result, many of the poorest people are being led into exploitative or unpredictable work. One of the most significant influencing factors is the change in the rural economy. International Labour Organisation statistics show that 80% of working people in developing countries earn their living from the rural economy. Yet the nature of farming is changing. Advances in technology and equipment have a positive impact on productivity but they often mean fewer people are needed to work on the land. These technologies aren't widely affordable hence exacerbate the technology divide between rural and urban, having negative consequences on livelihood opportunities and rural communities poverty. Many traditional livelihoods, such as weaving and pottery, have become all but redundant due to the availability of mass production and competition from overseas markets. Urbanisation is seeing a labour migration from rural areas and work, such as agriculture, to urban areas, such as industrial work, factory workers, garment workers, and hospitality. The work force is migrating towards cities in search of better opportunities. Climate change and natural disasters are driving people away from their home communities and where they can earn a living. Due to family pressures, children are increasingly needing to work to contribute to the income of the family, which means they miss out on school.

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Inclusion (instead of income generation)

Disability Inclusion?

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Income Generation

The ways in which people can earn a living in developing countries is changing rapidly and as a result, many of the poorest people are being led into exploitative or unpredictable work.One of the most significant influencing factors is the change in the rural economy. International Labour Organisation statistics show that 80% of working people in developing countries earn their living from the rural economy.Yet the nature of farming is changing. Advances in technology and equipment have a positive impact on productivity but they often mean fewer people are needed to work on the land. These technologies aren't widely afordable hence exacerbate the technology divide between rural and urban, having negative consequences on livelihood opportunities and rural communities poverty.Many traditional livelihoods, such as weaving and pottery, have become all but redundant due to the availability of mass production and competition from overseas markets. Urbanisation is seeing a labour migration from rural areas and work, such as agriculture, to urban areas, such as industrial work, factory workers, garment workers, and hospitality. The work force is migrating towards cities in search of better opportunities.Climate change and natural disasters are driving people away from their home communities and where they can earn a living. Due to family pressures, children are increasingly needing to work to contribute to the income of the family, which means they miss out on school.

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