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Bangladesh in numbers

OVERALL CHILD POPULATION (under 18yrs)

57.2 MILLION

3.7million

% of the population

NUMBER OF
WORKING CHILDREN

18

% of the population

MARRIED
AS CHILDREN

1990

year ratified

CONVENTION ON THE
RIGHTS OF THE CHILD

Disability focus

Number of disabled children in Bangladesh

8.6million

children
are disabled

Bangladesh has a large and increasingly urban population, with recent strong economic growth and thriving industries, particularly in garment production. The pull of paid work and the precariousness of Bangladesh’s climate result in many people moving to its growing cities.


However, it can be these very industries that are most hazardous to children, who can be forced to live and work in dangerous conditions in factories or dumpsites, or as child domestic workers, from a very young age. ChildHope is working with these children, and their families and communities, to enable them to choose education over hazardous work and live safer, healthier lives.

The realities of life in Bangladesh

Set up a monthly gift and give children a chance of a better future.

THROUGH OUR PARTNERS WE HELPED

72,121

CHILDREN LAST YEAR 

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Grambangla Unnayan Committee (GUC)

OUR GOAL:

Vision - A society without hunger, poverty, exploitation and injustice in which every person enjoys their right to a life with dignity. Mission - Our mission is “To work with poor and excluded people to eradicate poverty and injustice”.




LAST YEAR WE HELPED CHILDREN IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS

Protection from Violence
27,066
Promoting Participation
24,376
Promoted Learning
19,710

What they do

Grambangla Unnayan Committee (GUC) is a non-profit, non-political and non-governmental organisation, established on March 05 1993. It was registered under the Department of Social Service, Ministry of Social Welfare in 1997 and it is also registered with the NGO Affairs Bureau, Prime Minister’s Office of the Government of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh.


Grambangla is committed to making its programs socially, culturally, politically, financially and environmentally sustainable using knowledge and technology. Grambangla firmly believes and is actively involved in promoting human security, inclusion of the excluded, and gender equity.


Healthy futures for child waste pickers

Poverty in rural areas of Bangladesh pushes many families to migrate to the capital city of Dhaka in search of work and a better future. However, on arrival the reality is very different. Often families struggle to find work. Some families are forced to eke out a living sorting items for recycling on the city's sprawling rubbish dumps. They work 12-hour days to earn just £1-1.50. It is very dangerous work and children are particularly at risk in this hazardous environment. But parents have no choice but to bring them.

Girl waste picker

Nagorik Uddyog

Our goal: Nagorik Uddyog (Citizen's Initiative), as a nonprofit national development organisation, has been working to promote fundamental human rights of excluded poor, underprivileged minorities since its inception in 1995. Its prime focus is on greater and effective participation of disadvantaged and marginalised citizens especially women irrespective of class, culture or creed in its development initiatives.

What do they do: Through a research study and baseline survey, Nagorik Uddyog found a chronic lack of day-care and drop-in centre facilities for the children of underprivileged female garment workers and working children. In response, together with ChildHope, they established a programme of day-care and drop-in centres in two slum areas in Dhaka city. This complements Nagorik Uddyog’s advocacy work on garment and domestic workers, and informal sector and labour rights.

Empowering and Educating Female garment workers and their children

Although the garment industry in Bangladesh has provided opportunities for women to earn a living, it has also had a seriously negative impact on their children. The majority of textile workers are single mothers, who have very low education levels and serve as unskilled labour. Working long hours for extremely low pay and without access to childcare facilities, these mothers are forced to leave children as young as 2 years old alone or in the care of older siblings, exposing them to accidents, trafficking and sexual abuse.


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