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Kenya in numbers

OVERALL CHILD POPULATION (under 18yrs)

22.2 MILLION

2.9million

NUMBER OF
WORKING CHILDREN

34

% of the population

CHILDREN LIVING BELOW POVERTY LINE

4

% of the population

MARRIED
AS CHILDREN

1990

year ratified

CONVENTION ON THE
RIGHTS OF THE CHILD

Disability focus

Number of disabled children in Kenya

3.3

million children
are disabled

The realities of life in Kenya

Kenya is a major business and communications hub in East Africa. It has a growing economy and thriving finance and tourism industries. Many people have migrated to the cities in search of new opportunities.

Not everybody is benefiting from Kenya’s growth. ChildHope works with children who experience extreme poverty, violence and family disintegration, who live in informal settlements, slums and dumpsites. Approximately 60% of the 3.5 million inhabitants of Nairobi live in such conditions, occupying only 6% of the land and often denied their rights to basic services such as electricity, clean water, health and education.

Set up a monthly gift and give children a chance of a better future.

THROUGH OUR PARTNERS WE HELPED

72,121

CHILDREN LAST YEAR 

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Pendekezo Letu (PKL)

OUR GOAL: Pendekezo Letu, meaning "our choice" in Swahili, is a Kenyan non-governmental organisation that was established in May 1997 to assist street children and their families escape abject poverty and lead more fulfilling lives away from the streets and slums of Nairobi, Kenya. Their mission is to support vulnerable children and other disadvantaged community members in Kenya to fully access their fundamental human rights. PKL’s vision is to ensure that marginalised children and adults fully access their basic rights to education, information, protection from violence, justice, reproductive health care and improved opportunities for development and enjoy a marked improvement in the quality of their lives. In recognition of the fact that poverty is a consequence of the denial of basic human rights, PKL promotes a rights-based approach, combining activities which address both the immediate needs of its beneficiaries and build the capacity of deprived communities to effectively respond to social inequalities by demanding their basic rights to education, information, protection, justice, participation, health care and improved opportunities for development.


LAST YEAR WE HELPED CHILDREN IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS

Protection from Violence
27,066
Promoting Participation
24,376
Promoted Learning
19,710

The organisation's ongoing street work programme in Nairobi's city centre includes the following services; medical referral, counselling, recreation, family tracing and reintegration, street-based education, referral to schools, vocational training centres and other organisations, and the provision of business credit to small groups of children who choose not to leave the streets. PKL provides an intensive remedial education course based on the Kenyan 8-4-4 curriculum. Older siblings within each family are provided with sponsorship in skills training.

PLK's full time Advocate provides legal representation for children appearing in Nairobi's Juvenile and High Courts, as well as child rights education for juveniles held in remand homes around Nairobi.

www.pendekezoletu.org

Defending the right to education, protection and participation

PKL have developed a successful rehabilitation programme with girls living and working in Nairobi’s dumpsites and slum settlements. In 2015, we received a new three-year grant from Comic Relief to further extend into working with the communities the girls come from, and continue their vital work with children and young people in conflict with the law, who are so often forgotten by the rest of society.

Who we are helping: Every year, 100 extremely marginalised street-connected girls are selected to undergo an intensive, ten-month rehabilitation process, aiming to get them off the streets and back into education, supported by their families. The girls are carefully selected – while their lives are chaotic and marked by violence and extreme poverty, the project also looks for signs of potential reintegration with family and community, to ensure the ten-month investment can result in long-lasting change. This means intensive work with the girls’ siblings, parents and wider community, as well as work in schools and with the juvenile justice system, to ensure a well-rounded approach to the girls’ protection and support.


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