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“I have taken a loan to buy wool so I can develop a business knitting and selling jumpers. With the profits I earn, I’m investing in education for my children. I want them to finish school and be able to have a profession. That is my dream for my children and all the children living in the village.”

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Peru in numbers

OVERALL CHILD POPULATION (under 18yrs)

10.4 MILLION

1million

NUMBER OF
WORKING CHILDREN

4%

CHILDREN LIVING BELOW POVERTY LINE

3%

MARRIED AS CHILDREN

1990

year ratified

CONVENTION ON THE
RIGHTS OF THE CHILD

Disability focus

Number of disabled children in Peru

1.6

Million children
are disabled

The realities of life in Peru

Peru is enjoying a period of strong economic growth, with its major exports (copper and iron ore) increasing in value while unemployment is going down, making it one of the fastest growing economies in the region.

Inequality remains high and indigenous children are often expected to work rather than go to school, with education facilities in their areas often much poorer than the national average. ChildHope’s focus in Peru is to enable these children to access their right to education, improve its quality and help parents and communities to see the value in children going to school.

Set up a monthly gift and give children a chance of a better future.

THROUGH OUR PARTNERS WE HELPED

72,121

CHILDREN LAST YEAR 

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Amhauta

Our goal: to support the most marginalised members of society – indigenous children and women.


LAST YEAR WE HELPED CHILDREN IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS

Protection from Violence
27.066
Promoting Participation
24,376
Promoted Learning
19,710

Starting out in the 1990s as a women’s rights organisation in Cusco, Amhauta were formally recognised as an NGO in 2004. Their vision is to achieve better living conditions for indigenous children, young people and women, and support them to be recognised as equal and valued members of Peruvian society. Amhauta’s works with both rural indigenous communities as well those who have migrated to urban areas around Cusco, with projects supporting the quality and equality of education to Quechuan children, preventing risky migration and rural-urban trafficking of young girls, and financially and socially empowering indigenous women within communities.

With over 20 years’ experience directly supporting isolated, rural communities, Amhauta’s work has increased the participation of children, young people and women in local government and improved services to these usually forgotten communities. Their solid community base and links with Quechuan communities has also led to high profile collaborations with NGOs like UNICEF as well as local government.

Investing in their Future

An hour’s walk from the nearest road, Huasac has been a village since Inca times. Set in the stunning Andean region of Peru, the beauty of the area is clear. So too is its isolation. Life is precarious here, particularly for children. Grinding poverty is a daily reality. Over 70% of children suffer chronic malnutrition. Most families survive on £25 a month. Services that we take for granted – schools, health centres, electricity – are unreliable or non-existent. Tragedy hit a neighbouring village when 28 school children died of food poisoning because they didn’t have access to the medicine that could have saved their lives.

Centro de Estudios Sociales y Publicaciones (CESIP

CESIP (Centro de Estudios Sociales y Publicaciones) is a Peruvian child rights NGO founded in 1976. Their vision is for a just, inclusive and democratic society in which children and young people are full and equal members; their mission is to support and empower children to overcome the personal, social and institutional barriers which prevents them from achieving this. CESIP directly support working children and their families, as well as trafficked children and those at risk of or victims of sexual abuse. They work within schools to build the social skills and confidence of young people, strengthen protection mechanisms (within schools, communities and families), and advocate for children’s rights and protection at both national and regional levels. With over 40 years’ experience working Peru, CESIP’s work has directly led to many legislative changes in local government to implement policies directly for the prevention and eradication of child labour and dangerous work for young people. Furthermore, as runners up of the 2014 Stars Foundation Awards, CESIP’s work on Child Protection is globally recognised.

Making schools safer

Even though Peru is classed as a middle-income country, over 60% of Peruvian children still live in poverty and many face violence and abuse on a daily basis. Four children every month are killed within their own homes and high levels of violence are particularly prevalent in the poorest and most marginalized communities. Although many laws exist to protect children, these have done little to keep children safe.

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